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Ramin Skibba

Staff Writer

Ramin Skibba is WIRED’s space writer, where he covers the vastest beat, including space scientists, space environmentalists, space politics, space conflicts, and the space industry, from launch to reentry. Prior to joining WIRED, he freelanced for Scientific American, The Atlantic, Undark magazine, Slate, and other magazines, and before that, he explored the cosmos himself as an astrophysicist and he earned a master’s degree in science communication at the University of California, Santa Cruz. He’s based in San Diego.

The Mini Missions Aboard the Artemis Rocket Pack a Big Punch

Ten tiny satellites will be hitching a ride en route to the moon, each with scientific objectives of their own.

Why NASA Wants to Go Back to the Moon

The space agency’s upcoming lunar mission will launch the ambitious Artemis program, building on the landings 50 years ago.

Russia’s War in Ukraine Reveals More Problems in Space

While Roscosmos will likely continue its commitments on the ISS for at least a few more years, it’s not clear what comes next.

NASA Delayed the Psyche Launch. Here’s Why That’s a Big Deal

Heavenly bodies are always in motion: Pushing back the asteroid probe’s blastoff date could require a new trajectory, longer travel time, and much more power.

A Film Challenges the James Webb Telescope's Controversial Name

The documentary scrutinizes the former NASA administrator's role during an era of homophobic policies.

The JWST’s First Photos Show Its Extraordinary Power

The cosmic probe’s long-awaited images will kick off astronomers’ science programs.

Why the Search for Life on Mars Is Happening in Canada’s Arctic

Scientists show how microbes living in a salty spring near the North Pole might resemble those that could have survived on the Red Planet—or in ocean worlds.

The Capstone Launch Will Kick Off NASA’s Artemis Moon Program

The tiny spacecraft is set to explore an orbit for a planned space station that will travel around the moon and serve as a staging point for future missions.

NASA’s Giant SLS Rocket Is One Step Closer to Launch

After three aborted attempts, engineers successfully completed a practice countdown that included filling the tanks with liquid oxygen and hydrogen.

How Lori Garver Launched NASA’s Commercial Space Partnerships

WIRED spoke with the agency’s former deputy administrator about how she architected a major shift to working with the fledgling private space industry.

The Black Carbon Cost of Rocket Launches

Researchers say that the rising number of space launches around the world will warm parts of the atmosphere and thin the ozone layer.

The FAA Says SpaceX Can't Expand Its Texas Launch Site—Yet

SpaceX must address dozens of environmental issues before it can upgrade Starbase in Boca Chica. The launch license needed for the Starship program remains pending.

The First Privately Funded Killer Asteroid Spotter Is Here

Researchers at the B612 Foundation’s Asteroid Institute developed a new tool for tracking space-rock trajectories—even with limited data.

Researchers Made Ultracold Quantum Bubbles on the Space Station

NASA’s Cold Atom Laboratory runs super-low-temperature experiments in near-zero gravity that would be impossible to accomplish on Earth.

Boeing Is Ready to Launch Starliner, a Rival to SpaceX’s Dragon

The company’s uncrewed spacecraft will fly to the International Space Station, and if successful, will give NASA astronauts another way to get to orbit.

With Dusty Solar Panels, InSight’s Days on Mars Are Numbered

After the InSight lander studied the strongest marsquake ever detected, scientists gave the space robot a negative prognosis because of its dwindling solar power.

Researchers Grew Tiny Plants in Moon Dirt Collected Decades Ago

The seedlings sprouted in the regolith scooped up in the 1960s and ’70s, but astronauts won’t be harvesting lunar spuds anytime soon.

Delegates at the UN Have Begun Forging New Rules for Space

International experts are using earthly policies as models to hash out regulations for orbiting spacecraft, from preventing conflict to limiting trash.

Mars Colonies Will Need Solar Power—and Nuclear Too

A new study shows how future inhabitants of the Red Planet could run on either energy source, depending on where they set up camp.

NASA's Psyche Spacecraft Heads to Cape Canaveral

This August, following tests at the launch site, the probe will voyage to the middle of the solar system to do the first detailed study of a mostly metal asteroid.